The Conspiracy: Drugs in the Black Communities

The Conspiracy: Drugs in the Black Communities

war on drugsJamal stood before the, what he thought was a Mexican, and shook his hand, “pleased to meet you too”. “You’ve sold before,” the Mexican said in his thick accent. “Sure I’ve sold,” Jamal replied. “I’d like to introduce to you something new,” said the Mexican. The man to his left opened a briefcase, and there was very obvious bags of cocaine in it. “That ain’t new,” Jamal said, quite annoyed. “No, my friend, this is not new, but this is,” he held in his hand 5 off-white crystals. “I will teach you to turn that, into these,” as he handed him the crystals. Jamal held the crystals up and turned them about. They were definitely nothing he’d ever seen before. “You’re going to show me how to turn cocaine into this?” The Mexican nodded. “Yes, it’s called crack.”

Sydney took a sip from the bottle, not knowing what to think. Yes, he had sold grass, but to go to a meeting about grass. What was it about? Who goes to meetings about grass. The white boys come peddling their grass at the door, and you turn around and sell it. No meeting. No driving miles from the strip. He wasn’t nervous, but he didn’t know what to make of it. The car stopped. This was clearly near the docks. Everyone got out of the car and there were three other cars. There were white people everywhere, and not that normal grass growers he was used to. These guys were much older. And, he could tell they were armed. “No guns, Jamal had always told him.” Seemed like bad advice at times, but his reasoning was logical. If the police catch you with drugs, having a gun makes everything 10 times worse. They never hold for more than a day. These white cats looked like the hippies he saw on tv. One of them had a duffel-bag”Can you move the grass man,” asked one of them. Of course he could move the grass. They all looked at each other. They motioned Sydney and his partners to follow them. Behind the cars they saw rows of white, unmarked MAC trucks. “Here’s the grass man,” he pointed at the trucks. The other guy threw the duffel-bag to Sydney. “Don’t worry if you mess up, there’s way more, where that came from.”

Alphonze got into the limo. Two white girls were all over him in an instant. Across from him, sitting in a seat directly facing him, was an older white cat. “You the kid,” said the white man. Alphonze nodded, since no one else was in the limo with him. “I’m gonna send you my boy and he’ll show you the ropes,” he said as he tossed him a bag of something. Alphonze took his arms away from the adoring girls and held up the bag. It had, what looked like, a bunch of prescription drugs. There were all sorts of pills, and tiny strips of paper. “Hey, you got a car,” asked the white man. “Sure I got a car,” Alphonze said. He thought this was getting stranger by the minute, but money is money. “Good, I want you to come to some of my parties on the weekend,” he said as the car pulled to a stop. He motioned for Alphonze to get out. Next to the limo was a guy sitting on the hood of a Cadillac. It was a young white cat. “I’m your new best friend. Get in.”

Prior to the 70s there were little to no drugs in the Black communities. Black people were hard working and lived in segregated communities. They had their own businesses and services, since they were segregated. After the civil rights movement, that all changed. Black people were able to shop in town and even be in town after dark. Black people flocked to the white stores. You see, white stores were owned by white people. And, the white stores had white clients, that had white money, which was a heck of a lot more than Black people had. While Black stores were just as clean, reinvestment Black dollars were hard to come by in the poor Black communities. So the white stores were very often shinier and newer than what the poor Black people were used to. Black stores closed down across the land, plunging poor Black communities into even deeper poverty.

Then came the drugs. As if by magic, it showed up. Quantities of drugs flooded the community. It was cheap at first. So cheap because there was so much of it. The police seemed to not notice. Hell, most police, in those days, didn’t go into Black communities, since Blacks had their own police at first. But even those were fired, since cities refused to pay for separate Black police and fire stations and other services. The drugs were everywhere and new drugs, never seen before.

Something was wrong, very wrong. Families started to break apart. And white sentiments of “free love”, something that Black people, who were very traditional at the time, did not agree with, started creeping into the communities. Pockets of Black families started meeting and discussed what was going on. Then it came to a head when a white journalist happened into a Black community, researching the drugs. The families and the journalist pieced together a conspiracy that went so deep that the very foundations of the countries would be shaken.

They’d had enough. They called a meeting with the mayor and city council. Everyone was shocked and surprised when the head of the CIA showed up, unannounced. For 2 hours they yelled back and forth. Why was he there. And, he admitted nothing. The journalist questioned him, time and time again about his findings. The families questioned him about the connections. The mayor was out of his league and sat stunned.

Shortly after that, the largest drug dealers in the country started going to jail. It was an answer, but not a real answer to what was really going on. Because the drugs never went away, and they never stopped coming, not even a little bit.

CONCLUSION:

  • – there is strong evidence to support that the US federal government has been involved in, and is actively involved in introducing drugs into the Black community following the civil rights movement
  • – there is strong evidence that the US federal government funded several CIA covert operations with the sale of drugs in the Black community
  • – there is strong evidence that the US federal government trained local drug dealers in making and introducing crack cocaine, meth amphetamine and other harsh drugs into the Black community
  • – there is strong evidence that the US federal government were in direct contact and helped introduce some of the most notorious drug crime families directly to key Black drug dealers in the Black community
  • – there is strong evidence that DEA, and the US federal government import drugs and funnel them into the Black community
  • – there is strong evidence that the sale of drugs in the Black community helped fund the entire Florida economy, to the tune of 70% [no other research into other states was made, so it cannot be said whether or not it holds true of such high volume drug centers like California or other states ]
  • – there is strong evidence to support that colonel Oliver north and president Ronald Reagan initiated, organized or knew of drugs being sold in the Black community to fund their Iran / Contra operation, to give weapons and arms to the Contras in Central America
Advertisements

Published by

shakaama

Ex law school student. I was kicked out for revealing I had a heart actually beating inside. I used to be in a modern dance company. I'm working on my 7 miracles to be proclaimed a saint by the pope. #1 is really hard, but once i get over that hump the other 6 will be a cinch.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s