Leon Washington Goes to High School

Washing Your Black Kids Out of School and Life

Leon’s Tale

Leon was always a big kid.  He wasn’t too fast of a runner, but he could move his junk in a hurry.  When a high school coach sent him a letter before he left middle school telling him to try out for the football team, he was happy as a tic on a toad.  He tried out and of course made the team.  For four years he was on the football team.  He never missed a practice, but he also never studied.  He never turned in homework and football became his life.  He went on every trip and every home game.

When his mama asked him about his school work he simply said, it was taken care of or it was done.  When his senior year rolled around noone came to his house to ask him to join their college team.  He got no letters offering full scholarships to a university.  In fact everyone was silent.

Come graduation time, he was off the team, and unfortunately he was called to the counselor’s office.  Leon had flunked every test he took.  While in the counselor’s office he was asked to read this and that.  The counselor quickly realized that Leon couldn’t read on any functional level.  A letter arrived a week later.  Per the counselor’s recommendation, Leon was flunked out of school completely.  The counselor had gone back and audited every class he had taken in high school.  She had retroactively flunked him out of every class that required any reading.  Leon only had a shop class and four years of P.E. class to his credit.  The school district fully backed the counselor, at a hearing called for, by his mama.

When Leon applied to take the GED, he was refused because, by law, he didn’t have sufficient skill to even take the test.  In fact, the application he submitted to take the GED, even with help from his mama, who was no help at all, was illegible and poorly done.

Meanwhile, the coach was filling out more letters to big middle school kids around the district.  His fall roster was nearly filled already.  Twenty fast food stores had opened up since last year, and the while the school district do-gooders were panicking over an increase in child obesity, the coach was happier than a hound on a gut truck.

Tyrone’s Tale

Tyrone had never been a great student.  He was happy to get a D – on his report card.  He never understood school, nor why he was in it.  He was all about “gettin dolla bills” as he put it.  When he was approached about joining the basketball team at college, he didn’t know what to think.  He got a full ride though and so, he didn’t have to worry about student loans, much.  He did have to take out a loan for room and board.  In his sophomore year in college the coach gave him a car.  It wasn’t a big car, but he was happy to ride in it.  The girls at school loved to ride in it too.

One girl decided she had had enough of other girls riding in “her” man’s car, and she made it known that she and Tyrone were serious and he should stop letting the other “hookers” ride in his car.  After that, only she rode around in the car.  She even drove him around.

Tyrone did get game time, on the team, but he never started.  He just mainly went to practice and sat on the bench.  He practiced hard, thinking he could be like Jordan one day.  But, the coach never saw “whatever” in him and he never started.

Four years went by and his eligibility was up, since he had been held back in grade school a few times.  The coach told him he was off the team.  However, he had not graduated.  The coach told him, he might be able to play overseas, but he was not good enough for pro-ball here in the states.  When he went to the student center, the student adviser took one look at his file and shook his head.  The student worker was not very polite about it and was completely unsympathetic.  He felt that Tyrone had gotten special treatment in school and was passed by teachers with C’s and D’s just based on the influence of the coach and not by any actual school-work Tyrone had done.

Tyrone got an agent and landed regular seasonal tournaments around the nation.  He never graduated, nor received a degree.  He never went overseas, nor made any money to speak of.  After a short 5 years, all of his tournament money dried up and he no longer was eligible to pass the physicals to go.  The girl he had met in college dropped him when he was dismissed from the basketball team.

At the end of the day Tyrone was functionally illiterate and could not understand enough to even write a check properly.  His agent took all of his money and he ended up penniless.

Meanwhile the college scout made his rounds to find more guys to fill the bench for the basketball team.  He was told to pick guys good enough to make a couple of points, but not good enough to outshine the stars of the team.  The coach had too much invested in the stars for them to be outshone by some upstart.  The scout had a list of black kids he felt were perfect.  He got in his rented Lincoln Town Car Sedan and headed to his first game.


Conclusion

I interviewed several athletes to come up with these two scenarios.  Also in college I was approached more than once to serve as a surrogate for an athlete in certain classes.  I never did it though.  What’s worse, I know first hand that some athletes never go to class at all.

Of a 100 man team, about 80 of the teammates will never see the light of day, as far as the sport is concerned.  It is a complete waste of time for them to even be on the team.  They are there simply to play backup to the real players.  The smarter ones become coaches, at some point, but they have to get their school work done.  These individuals are about as rare as the star athletes though.

Call it racist or not, a lot of Black kids fall into this.  I read somewhere that around a whopping 70% of all Black students in high schools will be involved in one of the major 3 sports, taking up a majority of their time, to the point where their school work comes in a distant 2nd place.  When it’s all said and done, those 70% will be washed out of school and out of the system of life.  So you have an overwhelming majority of Black kids who are tricked into playing some sport they have no talent for, only to end up with no education and no future.  This is repeated over and over and over every year.

I won’t say it is a conspiracy, but I’m just saying, it sounds like a conspiracy.  The numbers are too large to be a coincidence.  And, you know what the intelligence community says about coincidences, “there is no such thing as coincidence.”  There is even instances where judges sentence students to join a team instead of go to juvenile detention or jail, putting them in a weird sort of custody of the team coach, as an acting probation officer.  This might look great on paper, student staying out of jail, but what if you did research and found that the “crime” was all made up, and that these “made-up crimes” popped up all over the country?  Does that reach the level of conspiracy, in your mind yet?

I heard quite a few sad tales of untalented “athletes” whom I knew were going nowhere, wishing they could go pro.

If you are a parent with a kid in sports, unless he’s a super star, make sure he is getting his home-work and attending his classes.  Do not set your own kid up to be a failure in life.  I beg you.

Please visit my legal website: Nevada DUI Attorneys
See me on YouTube: Seattle Cop Punches Black Teenage Girl

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shakaama

Ex law school student. I was kicked out for revealing I had a heart actually beating inside. I used to be in a modern dance company. I'm working on my 7 miracles to be proclaimed a saint by the pope. #1 is really hard, but once i get over that hump the other 6 will be a cinch.

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